Category Archives: ethnic techniques

Some Whitework in the Works

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Stitching bloggers all over seem to be owning up to the number of works in progress they have. I guess I’m looking at joining the bandwagon. I’m not quite ready to put up a full list, but I would like to share a couple of whitework projects I started over the past year but haven’t…

Whitecaps on the Waves

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Thanks for the compliments on the start of the center medallion on Ocean Waves. I definitely felt more comfortable by the last section of gold than I did when starting out! And I’m really glad that designer Judy Souliotis recommended starting with the lower portion of the waves, because the whitecaps were doubly challenging. For…

Japanese Couching: Starting the Center Waves

The center motif on Ocean Waves is stitched using a couching technique traditionally found in Japanese Embroidery. This is the first time I’ve ever tried it, though. The technique involves couching two strands of metallic (typically Japanese gold or silver) with a silk thread called couching silk (of course). Here’s the first section stitched in…

Planning a path in hardanger

When stitching filling stitches in hardanger embroidery, it’s very helpful to think through the order of stitching, or the path you’re going to take. I’ll walk through how I stitched the second end of my pastel hardanger piece (after I learned a few things with the first!). The first step is to cut out the…

Friday Finish: My first Hardanger

In the spirit of the Hardanger piece I’m working on now, I present the very first Hardanger design I ever stitched. Design: a runner made from doubling the bellpull design from Cross ‘N Patch’s Charity Sampler booklet Designer: Emie Bishop Technique: Hardanger and cross stitch Ground fabric: 32ct evenweave (jobelan, maybe?) Threads: pearl cotton and…

Hardanger: Option 3 Before and After

Last week I posted three options for the end area of my pastel hardanger design. The responses from readers overwhelmingly agreed that option 3 was the way to go. So, what does option 3 look like, once it’s stitched? The photo below gives a good idea of the “before” and the “after.” The picture of…